Benefits of Garlic

Garlic is another food item that can give a great number of healthy benefits.

So, eat it up. Preferably, diced and raw.

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Another one of the simple remedies that I wanted to start my blog with is raw, crushed garlic. Garlic is a native to Central Asia, one of the oldest cultivated plants, and predates written history. Garlic remedies have been recorded in Sanskrit documents for about 5,000 years and its use in China goes back 3,000 years. An Egyptian medical papyrus, the Ebers Codex, dates the use of garlic to about 1550 B.C.E. for many ailments, while Hippocrates, Aristotle, and Pliny also cited many uses.

Garlic has a healthy mix of B6, manganese, selenium, vitamin C, calcium, phosphorus, iron, potassium, copper, and complex carbohydrates. It protects against atherosclerosis and heart disease (by increasing HDL and decreasing total cholesterol levels). It has a long history as an infection fighter and termed the “Russian penicillin”, this is due to the antimicrobial activity of allicin. Allicin is shown to be effective against colds, flu, stomach viruses, Candida yeast, and even pathogenic microbes such as tuberculosis and botulism. By crushing or chopping you release the chemical allicin, and when the garlic is heated potency is reduced. So, chop the garlic as fine as possible and eat raw, add to a salad, or make guacamole.

Studies done on raw, chopped garlic have shown it to be useful for:

    • lowering cholesterol
    • reducing plaque; anticoagulant
    • broad spectrum anti-bacterial; protection against viruses, parasites, and fungi
    • anti-hypertensive

There is a large amount of research done on the anti-cancer benefits as well; showing reduced risk of distal colon cancer, intestinal cancer, stomach, esophageal, prostate, and breast cancer.

In 2008 the University of East London conducted a study of 52 patients with hospital acquired MRSA. After unsuccessful treatment with antibiotics, which also lower the immune system, they recovered fully when treated with a stabilized form of allicin.

With the amount of stress wearing down your immune system, why not give it a boost with a clove of garlic? Try including these small changes daily and see if it has an effect on your overall health.

Black garlic has phenomenal benefits and that post will be another to be continued… 

7 thoughts on “Benefits of Garlic

  1. Debbra March 2, 2013 / 1:23 am

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  2. Megan Kerkhoff, CHC, AADP February 22, 2013 / 1:20 pm

    When I feel like I’m coming down with something, I’ll make a fresh MSG-free broth with freshly minced garlic. I add it towards the end of cooking so that the garlic is mostly raw. It works fantastic!

    Like

  3. thecollectioncup February 18, 2013 / 10:05 pm

    I’m looking forward to seeing your tips, and thank you!

    Like

  4. Ellie February 18, 2013 / 7:46 pm

    Hi, I was so happy to see you are now following my blog! I hope you’ll feel free to comment in the future and I can pass on many helpful hints on keeping the entire mind, body and spirit healthy and fit! Great post above too!!

    Like

  5. thecollectioncup February 18, 2013 / 6:47 pm

    Yep, especially eaten raw! Try the hot water and lemon juice in the morning for LDL also.

    Like

  6. Kenny February 18, 2013 / 6:45 pm

    I had no idea garlic helped lower cholesterol. That’s a great little tid bit!

    Like

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